ALLERGY RESOURCES

COMPREHENSIVE ALLERGY RESOURCES FOR EVERYONE - THE TOP 14 ALLERGENS AND BEYOND

COMPREHENSIVE ALLERGY RESOURCES FOR EVERYONE - THE TOP 14 ALLERGENS AND BEYOND
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CORIANDER ALLERGY


Key Allergens

Coriander is a herb, commonly called cilantro in the USA. As a rare allergy it is not well studied and there has been no confirmation of which allergens are causing the reactions.

Allergic reactions are most likely caused by profilin proteins which can cause allergic reactions in uncommon circumstances. Some profilin proteins can give oral allergy type symptoms and is more specifically called Celery Mugwort Spice Syndrome.

Associated Syndromes

Some profilin proteins can give oral allergy type symptoms and is more specifically called Celery Mugwort Spice Syndrome. You may have this syndrome if you suffer from coriander allergy with oral allergy symptoms to 3 or more of the foods mentioned in the cross reactivity section.

Cross Reactivity

Coriander is in the family Apiaceae, other spices in this family are anise, caraway seed, celery, chervil, cumin, dill, fennel and parsley.

Other plants containing profilin inhalant allergens are ragweed, wormwood, birch, sunflower, olive, plantain, poplar and oak.

Profilins are also found as food allergens in kiwi, celery, peanut, chilli, watermelon, orange, hazelnut, melon, carrot, strawberry, soya, walnut, lychee, lupin, apple, cherry, almond, peach, pear, mustard, tomato and aubergine.

The foods most commonly linked to Celery Mugwort Spice Syndrome are peach, melon, celery, carrots, camomile, fennel and other spices from the Apiaceae family which include coriander, caraway seed, celery, chervil, cumin, dill, aniseed and parsley.

Resources

Websites

Allergen Encyclopedia - Coriander

Science Direct - Coriander

How to Recognize a Cilantro Allergy

Coriander allergy – watch out for ‘spices’!


Articles and Journals

Pollen-food allergy syndrome in children, 2020

Chronic urticaria in a two year old child: a diagnostic dilemma, 2020

New allergens from spices in the Apiaceae family: anise Pimpinella anisum L. and caraway Carum carvi L., 2020

Oral allergy syndrome–the need of a multidisciplinary approach, 2014

Coriander Anaphylaxis in a spice grinder with undetected occupational allergy, 2006

Characterization of allergens in Apiaceae spices: anise, fennel, coriander and cumin, 2006



Let me know if you found any of these interesting or useful. If you spot an article or research that you think is interesting you can message me or tag me on Facebook or Twitter - links at the bottom of the page.


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