ALLERGY RESOURCES

COMPREHENSIVE ALLERGY RESOURCES FOR EVERYONE - THE TOP 14 ALLERGENS AND BEYOND

COMPREHENSIVE ALLERGY RESOURCES FOR EVERYONE - THE TOP 14 ALLERGENS AND BEYOND

SPINACH ALLERGY


Key Allergens

Spinach is a plant in the Amaranthaceae family of plants. Other plants in this group include chard, beetroot, quinoa and amaranth.

Spinach is associated with Latex Food Syndrome, chard and beetroot contain chitinase-like proteins which are linked to Latex allergy.


Food Intolerances

Food is low in FODMAP Food is high in histamine Food is high in salicylates

Spinach is a food high in histamine, so is not suitable for people following a low histamine diet.

Spinach is a low FODMAP food. FODMAP stands for Fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols. Foods high in FODMAPs can cause symptoms of food intolerance, affecting the gastro intestinal system and this can be mistaken for a true IgE food allergy.

Fresh spinach is a food high in salicylates, frozen spinach has less present. Salicylates have the potential to cause gastrointestinal food intolerance symptoms in people who are sensitive to salicylates.

You can read more about Food Intolerances on the dedicated Food Intolerance Page.

Associated Syndromes

An allergy to spinach is associated with "Alternaria-Spinach syndrome". This is a rare syndrome and causes cross reactivity reactions in spinach and mushrooms (specifically a mould). This is more common in asthmatics as the proteins are involved in aero allergens.

Spinach has also been linked to Latex Food Syndrome.


Cross Reactivity

The Alt a 1 allergen in the Alternaria fungus is the cross reacting protein in Alternaria-Spinach Syndrome.

Other plants in the Amaranthaceae family of plants include chard, beetroot, quinoa and amaranth.

The proteins involved in Latex Food Syndrome are hevein and chitinase.

Chitinase is found in avocado, banana, chestnuts, mango, corn (maize), kiwi, papaya, pomegranate, tamarind, cashews and tomatoes. Chitinase allergens can also affect the airways and can be found in coffee, cockroaches and dust mites.

Hevein proteins are found in rubber trees (as a contact allergen) and in turnip (as a food allergen).

These food lists are not exhaustive, the most up to date information is on the Cross Reactivity Tool.




Resources

Websites

Allergen Encyclopedia - Spinach

Science Direct - Amaranthaceae

High Histamine Foods

Healthline - FODMAP Foods

ATP Science - Salicylate Foods

Anaphylaxis Campaign - Vegetables


Articles and Journals

Pollen food allergy syndrome secondary to molds and raw mushroom cross-reactivity: a case report, 2024

Pattern of Food Allergen Sensitivity Amongst Adult Allergic Rhinitis Patients: A Four Year Central Indian Study, 2023

Plant Food Dyes with Antioxidant Properties and Allergies—Friend or Enemy? 2023

Recent Advances in the Allergic Cross-Reactivity between Fungi and Foods, 2022

Alternaria as an Inducer of Allergic Sensitization, 2021

Cross-Reactive Aeroallergens: Which Need to Cross Our Mind in Food Allergy Diagnosis? 2018

Cross-reactivity between aeroallergens and food allergens, 2015

Urticaria and angioedema to rubisco allergen in spinach and tomato, 2012

Description of a Novel Panallergen of Cross-Reactivity between Moulds and Foods, 2009

Occupational asthma due to allergy to spinach powder in a pasta factory, 2005

A case of latex fruit syndrome caused by spinach and eggplant , 2004

Crossed spinach-latex allergy revealed by exercise-induced anaphylaxis, 1999

Oral allergy syndrome induced by spinach, 1997



Let me know if you found any of these interesting or useful. If you spot an article or research that you think is interesting you can message me or tag me on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter - links at the bottom of the page.


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